Nonfiction November TBR

Nonfiction November is an event hosted by abookolive on Youtube. This is the sixth year and the goal is to read more nonfiction then you usually do. If you read one nonfiction book, then you are participating. There are four one word prompt challenges each round. This year the prompts are Time, Movement, Buzz, and Discovery.

I’m not choosing books to fit those prompts. I’m the middle of a whole lot of books at the moment and won’t be starting anything new for this readathon, but because I haven’t been here for a while you don’t know what I’m currently reading. I thought this would be a good way to share the six nonfiction books I’m reading right now. Hopefully most of them will be finished up in November using this readathon as a good way to finish them. Blurbs and pictures are from Goodreads.

Stamped From the Beginning by Ibram X Kendi

In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti–Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the lives of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and anti-racists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W. E. B. Du Bois to legendary anti–prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro–civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America.

As Kendi illustrates, racist thinking did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Racist ideas were created and popularized in an effort to defend deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and to rationalize the nation’s racial inequities in everything from wealth to health. While racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much–needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers tools to expose them—and in the process, reason to hope.

I Can’t Stop Crying by John D Martin

“I Can’t Stop Crying is a down-to-earth book for all those who think they are alone.”Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, MD The death of someone close — a spouse or partner — can result in overwhelming grief. At the same time, society unrealistically expects people to recover from grief as quickly as possible.

I Can’t Stop Crying looks at grieving as a painful but necessary process. The authors emphasize the importance of giving yourself permission to grieve and suggest steps for rebuilding your life without your loved one. They also look at how such a loss affects your relationship with family and friends, as well as your lifestyle, work habits, and hopes for the future. A useful appendix lists bereavement groups and other self-help organizations you can contact for assistance.

There is no way to lessen or quicken the grieving process. Recovery is possible only by taking the time to work through your pain. This compassionate and sensible book will help you take the first steps down that road. It can, and should, be read by anyone who has experienced a significant loss.

How to Talk So Little Kids Will Listen by Joanna Faber and Julie King

What do you do with a little kid who…won’t brush her teeth…screams in his car seat…pinches the baby…refuses to eat vegetables…throws books in the library…runs rampant in the supermarket? Organized according to common challenges and conflicts, this book is an essential emergency first-aid manual of communication strategies, including a chapter that addresses the special needs of children with sensory processing and autism spectrum disorders.

This user-friendly guide will empower parents and caregivers of young children to forge rewarding, joyful relationships with terrible two-year-olds, truculent three-year-olds, ferocious four-year-olds, foolhardy five-year-olds, self-centered six-year-olds, and the occasional semi-civilized seven-year-old. And, it will help little kids grow into self-reliant big kids who are cooperative and connected to their parents, teachers, siblings, and peers.

Will I Ever Be Good Enough? by Karyl McBride

The first book for the millions of daughters suffering from the emotional abuse of selfish, self-involved mothers, Will I Ever Be Good Enough? provides the expert advice readers need to overcome debilitating histories and reclaim their lives.
Parenting with Love and Logic by Foster W Cline and Jim Fay

This parenting book shows you how to raise self-confident, motivated children who are ready for the real world. Learn how to parent effectively while teaching your children responsibility and growing their character. Establish healthy control through easy-to-implement steps without anger, threats, nagging, or power struggles. Indexed for easy reference.
How to Be Fine by Jolenta Greenberg and Kristen Meinzer

A humorous and insightful look into what advice works, what doesn’t, and what it means to transform yourself, by the co-hosts of the popular By the Book podcast.

In each episode of their podcast By the Book, Jolenta Greenberg and Kristen Meinzer take a deep dive into a different self-help book, following its specific instructions, rules, and advice to the letter. From diet and productivity to decorating to social interactions, they try it all, record themselves along the way, then share what they’ve learned with their devoted and growing audience of fans who tune in.

In How to Be Fine, Jolenta and Kristen synthesize the lessons and insights they’ve learned and share their experiences with everyone. How to Be Fine is a thoughtful look at the books and practices that have worked, real talk on those that didn’t, and a list of philosophies they want to see explored in-depth. The topics they cover include:

Getting off your device
Engaging in positive self-talk
Downsizing
Admitting you’re a liar
Meditation
Going outside
Getting in touch with your emotions
Seeing a therapist

Before they began their podcast, Jolenta wanted to believe the promises of self-help books, while Kristen was very much the skeptic. They embraced their differences of opinion, hoping they’d be good for laughs and downloads. But in the years since launching the By the Book, they’ve come to realize their show is about much more than humor. In fact, reading and following each book’s advice has actually changed and improved their lives. Thanks to the show, Kristen penned the Amish romance novel she’d always joked about writing, traveled back to her past lives, and she broached some difficult conversations with her husband about their marriage. Jolenta finally memorized her husband’s phone number, began tracking her finances, and fell in love with cutting clutter.

Part memoir, part prescriptive handbook, this honest, funny, and heartfelt guide is like a warm soul-baring conversation with your closest and smartest friends.

Of these seven choices the one I am enjoying the most is the last one. It’s fun, fast and short, but still filled with valuable insights. I’ve added several of the titles they talk about to my wishlist for future purchase and reading. Are you reading anything for Nonfiction November this year?

One thought on “Nonfiction November TBR

  1. I read nonfiction everyday. I serve as a volunteer bookkeeper in a local library where I get to read something or the other for a while. Not a lot of freedom to be honest. For example: today I read some rules about linguistics with a resolution to keep this nice Hindi book in my to-read-list. Thanks for motivation to read.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s