March 2020 Haul Revisit

In March of 2020 I acquired 17 books. I’ve read three of those. The 14 I have left to read are listed below.

The Wonder by Emma Donoghue

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness

The Ask and the Answer by Patrick Ness

Monsters of Men by Patrick Ness

All the Ugly and Wonderful Things by Bryn Greenwood

Less by Andrew Sean Greer

The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey

They Left us Everything by Plum Johnson

So Close the Being the Sh*t Y’all Don’t Even Know by Retta

Always too Much and Never Enough by Jasmin Singer

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Darling Rose Gold by Stephanie Wrobel

The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne

The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner

Of these 14 books I haven’t read yet I’m going to choose to read Less by Andrew Sean Greer in March because it feels the least intense.

PROBLEM:
You are a failed novelist about to turn fifty. A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: your boyfriend of the past nine years now engaged to someone else. You can’t say yes–it would all be too awkward–and you can’t say no–it would look like defeat. On your desk are a series of half-baked literary invitations you’ve received from around the world.

QUESTION: How do you arrange to skip town?

ANSWER: You accept them all.

If you are Arthur Less.

Thus begins an around-the-world-in-eighty-days fantasia that will take Arthur Less to Mexico, Italy, Germany, Morocco, India and Japan and put thousands of miles between him and the problems he refuses to face. What could possibly go wrong?

Well: Arthur will almost fall in love in Paris, almost fall to his death in Berlin, barely escape to a Moroccan ski chalet from a Sahara sandstorm, accidentally book himself as the (only) writer-in-residence at a Christian Retreat Center in Southern India, and arrive in Japan too late for the cherry blossoms. In between: science fiction fans, crazed academics, emergency rooms, starlets, doctors, exes and, on a desert island in the Arabian Sea, the last person on Earth he wants to see. Somewhere in there: he will turn fifty. The second phase of life, as he thinks of it, falling behind him like the second phase of a rocket. There will be his first love. And there will be his last.

A love story, a satire of the American abroad, a rumination on time and the human heart, by an author The New York Times has hailed as “inspired, lyrical,” “elegiac,” “ingenious,” as well as “too sappy by half,” Less shows a writer at the peak of his talents raising the curtain on our shared human comedy.

Have you read this book? I’ve heard it’s funny.

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